Flowers!

Hello and welcome our friends and readers from every where: the US, Hungary, India, the UK, Croatia, Ireland, Brazil, and Bahamas ūüėČ

Ashley sent us a message describing a class that she attended with Dan two days ago. The school was Marchus and the location was in CA.

This is what she shared with all of us:
“I consider Dan and I were lucky to attend a botany class with the ROP* two days ago.

We observed one of the few really quite-talented teachers. He gave a lesson about the parts of a Flowers-Sophieflower in a very simple yet full of a hands-on-the-job kind of skill, where he added a joke in between parts of the lesson, and confirmed some facts by associating them with insects’ names or others.

The opening part was amazing when he started his class by having a student pass to others a flower drawing , telling the students that they were expected to color that drawing according to the explanation he would give to them, and the already colored flower drawing he stuck to the board, and which had the names of each part of the flower.

The students were very attentive sitting around a rectangular table facing the board. It was a standard setting and the teacher was standing with his back to the board.

He pointed at the parts of the flower when he moved from one name to the other. nl18The first thing he asked the students was what’s the first part of the flower that you normally¬†notice or recognize first?, to which one student answered the leaves, and another said the petals. The teacher nodded his head for the second answer confirming that fact, and started describing the petals and the different colors that each flower has, and the purpose of having the colored petals.

Then he talked about he smell of the flower after he asked the student what was the second thing that you do when you approach that flower?

The class went on and on, and for the fifteen minutes we were there observing that genius teacher, we kept looking at each other admiring each part he explained and mastered.

The way he used his body language when shaking his face acting like a bee to his class, the harmony when he moved from one part to the other, and the methods he used in carrying that scientific materials presenting it gently to his young students. It was all fascinating.  It was hard for Dan and I to describe it, because he was phenomenal!

We liked to share this with all of you to express our admiration and appreciate not only for Stevens, the Botany teacher, but for all teachers everywhere, who master their materials and deliver in the best way possible to their students. Thank you.”

We have no comment yet on this post, but I’m sure that it would relate to many of you. I hope you’d see the good example in this teacher, as Ashley and Dan did!

Until we talk again, here’s our love and kisses ‚̧

*ROP: Regional Occupational Program

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