And It Did!

Hello dear readers and friends. We always miss chatting with you. Thank you for coming to our pages, to see the new in our world. Thank you for the US, Turkey, India, & the UK 😉

We received a letter to give our comments and feedback. Here’s what it says:

“In an attempt to fulfill my science core without having to challenge myself, I enrolled in a class called “The Physics of Music and Sound”. I liked music, and the catalog described the course in a way that had me envisioning musical instruments of all kinds, and , oddly enough, a laser light show.

As I soon found out, the physics of music and sound were not easy, nor were they fun to learn about.I was a creative writing major, and veered away from anything remotely scientific. Having Dr. E. as a teacher didn’t help the cause. She was a brilliant woman, the kind of genius who often showed up late in a stained shirt, with her hair askew; her mind was simply operating at a level too high to be concerned with the minutiae of his daily appearance.

She was socially inept, but an incredible physicist. Shortly after my class she was recruited by a much better school to supervise some sort of research. She was also a terrible teacher.

Physics came easily to Dr E . In the beginning of the semester , I asked questions constantly. At first she would stop her lecture, only to stare blankly pat me, and, after hearing my question, repeat verbatim what she had just said. Sometimes, she would shake her head in confusion and say, “I don’t know how to answer that. I don’t understand what you don’t get. I can’t make it any simpler. ” As the semester went on, she simply turned her head away from any student who had their hands raised.

Some of the more analytic students were fine with that. But there were plenty of us who were not. One malcontent suggested we all talk to the dean. Instead, I decided to speak to the professor. I knew that we processed things very differently. I wasn’t sure we could even communicate. 

However, I suspected she would relate to my frustration at not being able to understand something no matter how many angles I approached it from. Using that as my lead, I approached her.

During our conversation, I learned that Dr E was attempting to write a textbook, we worked out a deal: for extra credit, I could provide feedback on each of the chapters as she wrote. My point of view, as it turned out, was exactly what she needed-I was her audience.  I told her that the more feedback she received , the better off she would be in the end. As a result, she offered the same deal to other students in the class. Some students who, like me, signed up for the class as a way to meet a science core, quickly jumped at the chance to avoid failing.

As it turned out, physics was fun. I learned more about the nature of sound reviewing that book that I did from the semester that I paid for. I also learned that no matter how different two people are, a compromise can always be reached.”

All what we can say is that it’s a perfect conclusion, and an excellent model of clarity in vision. How this student handled the situation was very smart. Why to waste time on complaints and generating dislike situations? Why don’t you focus on your goal? Why not to deal with it in a simpler way, and it might work. And it did!

Until we chat some more, here’s our hugs & kisses ❤

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